Planning Precedents

from http://www.tlio.org.uk/chapter7/planningprecedents

 

Planning Precedents

Submitted by Russ on Wed, 02/04/2009 – 23:24

Planning   Documents

Tinker’s Bubble Management Plan 1999 to 2004 – March 1999 – Tinker’s Bubble is a community that has recieved planning permission for their low-impact dwellings. This is a copy of the Section 106 agreement that they made with the planners. The temporary planning permission they received was made contingent upon the management plan.

Tir Penrhos Isaf planning history – Tir Penrhos Isaf is a permaculture smallholding on the edge of Snowdonia National Park, they have recently gotten a renewal of temporary permission for residing on their smallholding.  To view the story of their planning battle and read relevant planning documents, click the link to their website here:

http://www.konsk.co.uk/planning/plan1.htm

 


Tinker’s Bubble Management Plan 1999 – 2004

March 1999

Part A

I. General Information

I.1 Grid Reference ST 486158

I.2 County Somerset

I.3 District South Somerset

I.4 Parish Norton sub Hamdon

I.5 Situation The site occupies the south facing slope of Ham Hill. It is reached from a narrow unclassified road eastwards from the hamlet of Little Norton.

I.6 Site Area Approximately 40 acres (16 hectares).

I.7 Primary Features Woodland, hedges, orchards, pasture, streams/springheads. Public Footpaths. Experimental residential settlement.

I.8 Tenure The land is being transferred to the freehold ownership of a co-operative entitled Tinker’s Bubble Land Ltd.

I.9 Compartments For management purposes the site is divided into six compartments (Map 2). The boundaries and hedges will be dealt with separately. Compartments 1 and 5 consist of 14 acres of orchard and pasture, while the other four compartments contain 26 acres of woodland. The residential settlement is in compartment 2.

I.10 Past management It appears that throughout much of its history the Northern slopes of this site were managed as woodland and despite the presence of exotic species, such as Douglas Fir, some ancient woodland indicator species still survive. The condition of many of the Ash and Hazel trees suggest that they were previously coppiced and some of the stools are very large, indicating a long history of coppicing. The Douglas Fir and much of the Larch was planted for commercial timber production by Economic Forestry Ltd in about 1960.

A few meadow species are present in the orchard and pasture areas, indicating that these areas have probably been clear of woodland for some time and managed either by grazing or regular mowing. The westernmost orchard in compartment 1 was known within living memory as Òhemp closeÓ. The terraces in compartment 1 were created some 50 years ago and originally planted with cherry trees. Many of the hedges are mature or derelict and may have been managed by laying in the past.

II. Environmental Information

II.1 Geology Ham Hill stone over Yeovil sands.

II.2 Soils Fine and clays, base rich, easily eroded when exposed to heavy rains. Peaty acidic soils where waterlogging occurs over clays.

II.3 Biological summary Part of the site is a County Wildlife Site as designated by the Somerset Wildlife Trust. The site contains a mixture of habitat and plant communities from mixed broadleaf woodland to monoculture conifer plantation, hazel coppice, embanked hedgerows, aquatic habitats and grassland. The site provides a habitat for deer, badger, fox, buzzards, goldcrests, green woodpeckers, grasssnakes and other species.

The Ancient Woodland Inventory identifies part of the wood as ancient semi-natural. Ancient woodland indicators include moschatel, field maple, pendulous sedge, holly, bluebell, town hall clock and dogs mercury. Other notable species include wych elm and scaly male fern.

II.4 Sources of data

  • Somerset Environmental Record Centre (visit 1990);
  • a 1994 visit and draft plan prepared by H. Baschkovska of the Hants Wildlife     Trust;
  • a report by Wessex Environmental Assessment (1994);
  • a woodland report by D. Wood (1994);
  • Tinker’s Bubble Forestry Plan;
  • a biological survey carried out by T Bell and C Cornell (1995).

II.5 Archaeology The 1839 Tithe maps show two areas of ancient coppice, suggesting that the main central area of the wood, just north of the east west public footpath may not be of ancient origin.

There are no known archaeological earthworks but there are two dry ditches and banks in compartment 2 of unknown origin, possibly former boundary banks. The pond in compartment 6 was associated with the local flax industry.

Ancient monument No 106 Ham Hill lies to the north and its boundary just touches the north east corner of compartment 4.

II.6 Landscape The site lies in a designated Special Landscape Area (Yeovil Area Local Plan) and in Region 4 (Ham Hill Plateau, Yeovil Sands Escarpments and Valleys and in particular character Zone 3 (Ham Hill Stone Hills and Valleys) of ‘the Landscape of South Somerset’ 1993.

The area is part of a much larger region of considerable character and interest, centred on Ham Hill plateau. It consists of wooded escarpments and valley slopes, semi-improved sheep/cattle grazed permanent pasture, hazel and ash coppice hedges, lanes, holloways and orchards.

II.7 Ecological siting Norton Covert and its associated orchards are part of a greater ecological unit in association with the Ham Hill Country Park which now includes Witcombe Valley. It is very likely that the larger mammals and avian predators take advantage of Norton Covert along with neighbouring woodland. The wooded lanes, holloways and streams interconnect the nearby woodlands. The spring in the wood feeds a tributary of the Parrett catchment. The stream joins the river Parrett just below Creedy Bridge.

III. Detailed Description by Compartment

III.1 Compartment 1 9.1 acres. This consists of: 3 acres of Bramley semi-standard orchards, 1.5 acres of dwarf eating-apples (mainly coxes), 3 acres of pasture and 1.5 acres of brambles shielding regenerating oak and ash. In 1998 1.5 acres of dwarf eating-apples were removed to be replaced in the year 2000/2001 with standard traditional apple varieties.

The southern boundary of the orchards abuts a RUPP and there is a small car park in the middle of this boundary. Near to the car park a barn is being constructed which will serve to house a sawmill and as an apple and vegetable packing shed.

The boundary hedges are mature coppice hazel, elm, hawthorn, cherry etc. and are very gappy. On the Western edge the hedge is overshadowed by the woodland. The eas tern boundary is a poplar windbreak. A new hedge, with a variety of species has been planted in front of the car park.

III.2 Compartment 2 7 acres. This is part of Norton Covert and consists of 90 per cent Douglas Fir with a fringe of broadleaves including some quite large hornbeam and ash. The understorey, comprising a few hazel stools and laurel stands is poor where the Douglas remains unthinned. An area adjacent to the stream has been cleared of laurel and has been planted with mixed deciduous trees, as well as exhibiting naturally regenerating ash and sycamore.

There are two substantial banks and dry ditches running east west. The settlement is located at the eastern end in between these ditches. There is an abandoned underground reservoir near the south west corner.

III.3 Compartment 3 8 acres. This comprises the remaining area of Douglas Fir with remnants of broadleaved woodland, ash coppices and a hornbeam grove in the south eastern corner. In the vicinity of a large stone pine there is a large area of naturalized snowdrops. Apart from this, under the Douglas the herb-layer and understorey is virtually non-existent.

The southern boundary is the east-west footpath, a popular route to Ham Hill Country Park. The northern and eastern boundaries with the country park are not delineated by any fence, but a n umber of large ash coppices and a large beech tree may have served as boundary markers.

III.4 Compartment 4 5.5 acres. This area was planted with larch around 1960. The larch have not been thinned and a number are falling or leaning. The shade of the larch is less dense than the Douglas and more sympathetic to the understorey which is dominated by ferns and dogs mercury. There is a greater proportion of ash than in compartments 2 and 3 and there are about 100 large hazel stools scattered unevenly around the area. An area of approximately 0.5 acres has been felled, in accordance with the previous management plan and replanted with ash, sweet chestnut, cherry and larch.

The Southern boundary is the east/west ride; the western boundary bordering the country park is marked by a strip of hazel coppice; Northern boundary with the country park is delineated by an overgrown and gappy hawthorn hedge, starved of light by the trees, but there is no fence.

III.5 Compartment 5 4.7 acres. This is a mature orchard of cox and russet semi-standards. An old name for this field was ‘shipway’ or ‘sheepway’. The coxes are some 40 years old and yield nothing while the russets are probably younger and yield intermittently. All the trees are diseased and cankered. The field has been fenced and is grazed by a horse and sheep. About one qu arter of an acre in the north eastern corner is cultivated, and there is a field shelter in this corner. Another half acre in the south western corner is being cleared for cultivation.

The northern and eastern boundaries abut the woodland and contain hazel, holly and other smaller trees; the western boundary is overgrown banked hazel; the hedge along the southern boundary has been cut back and replanted, primarily with hawthorn.

III.6 Compartment 6 6 acres. This compartment contains mixed broadleaf (ash, sycamore, alder, willow, hazel, oak etc.) and conifer (Douglas Fir and Yew). Much of the deciduous wood is tall and whippy. Nearly two acres have been fiercely invaded by cherry laurel, though some of this has been cleared.

Aquatic features include the springhead, a boggy area around it, the stream, and the small waterfall onto the road. The marshy area harbours aquatic flora including hemlock, water dropwort, opposite leaved golden saxifrage and greater horsetail. There is a small pond near the road fed by a diversion from the stream. Over the last few years laurel and sycamore have been cleared from around the stream to let in more light.

Part B

IV Evaluation of Features

IV.1 Size This is a small wood by national standards but of considerable importance in the context of South Somerset, where woodland cove, at 4.1 per cent, is considerably below the national average of 7.4 per cent (one of the lowest levels in Europe.)

IV.2 Diversity The site is quite diverse with three different types of woodland, the most significant being the mixed woodland in compartments 4 and 6. Here the original semi-natural woodland has been diversified by the addition of exotic and naturalized trees such as sycamore and larch. The streams and associated wetlands add further to the diversity. The orchards and grasslands, although highly managed, also add to the diversity. The hedgerow habitats are also important.

IV.3 Naturalness The site is not particularly natural. the original semi-natural wood is only recognizable in parts where the coppice remains and the flora is undisturbed. Most of the woodland has been extensively replanted with exotic firs. There are few really old trees and most of these are multi-stemmed coppice. The hedges are perhaps the most semi-natural features of the site.

IV.4 Rarity There are a number of county notable species of plant and animal (see SERCs report and Bell and Cornell’s biological survey).

IV.5 Fragility The main fragility of the site relates to the aquatic habitats. The wetland plant communities associated with the stream are vulnerable to tramp ling. The ancient woodland flora that survives in some parts of the covert is very vulnerable to indiscriminate trampling or destruction during woodland management and may be very marginal where the shade of the conifers continues to increase. Windthrow of trees exposed by woodland management may be a problem. The steep slopes, the nature of the soils and heavy winter rainfall, causing soil erosion, silting of the stream and pond are factors to be considered. Human settlement can cause problems of eutrophication unless measures are taken to deal with sewage, waste food etc.

IV.6 Typicalness The surviving flora is typical of such woodlands in the area. A unique aspect is the settlement and the effort to manage the wood in a sustainable manner whilst living within it.

IV.7 Ecological Position Norton Covert is not isolated from surrounding habitats. The generally low-input, low-output and marginal nature of farming in the area, and the difficult terrain have led to the survival of a large number of habitats and plant communities of much quality in nature conservation terms. Norton Covert lies at the centre of 13 County Wildlife Sites, all within 2 kilometres. These sites are linked by a mosaic of green lanes holloways and hedgerows. This area is therefore of great interest and the loss or damage of any one area is to the detriment of their neighbouring sites, especially given the intensive low-land farming taking place to the west.

IV.8 Potential Value The site has great potential for enhancement of nature conservation and landscape value which should in turn increase its recreational appeal. The timber value of the Douglas Fir and to a lesser extent of the larch, is also very high if it is extracted and marketed appropriately.

IV.9 Intrinsic Appeal The site has appeal to specialist and non-specialist alike. The high accessibility and footpath links to Ham Hill and Witcombe Valley all add to the appeal and enjoyment of the woodland.

Part C

V. Aims and Objectives

V.1 Aims The aims of the management plan are:

A. TO MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE THE HABITATS AND SPECIES DIVERSITY.

B. TO MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE THE LANDSCAPE QUALITY.

C. TO FACILITATE THE PROVISION OF LIVELIHOODS AND AN INCREASE IN PRODUCTIVITY, WITHOUT PREJUDICE TO AIMS A AND B.

D. TO HAVE REGARD FOR ALL LEGAL OBLIGATIONS AND OTHER RESPONSIBILITIES.

These aims are translated into the following operational objectives:

V.2 Woodland To conserve and enhance the woodland to retain its wildlife and landscape value by traditional and sustainable forms of management, whilst realizing a sustainab le income from the timber. The area will be managed under a system of group selection, whereby trees will be planted and felled in groups, providing an element of continuous cover. The eventual aim will be mixed woodland with different age classes.

V.3. Hedges To conserve and enhance the hedgerows and hedgerow trees to ensure they retain wildlife value and continue as important landscape features.

V.4 Orchards To improve the orchards by gradually replacing the present stock with traditional standard varieties propitious for organic cultivation and increasing the diversity of varieties and species.

V.5. Grassland To conserve and enhance the quality of the meadowland through rotated grazing of organically maintained livestock and hay making.

V.6. Aquatic Habitats To conserve and enhance the spring, stream, marsh area and pond and to ensure they retain wildlife and recreational value through a policy of minimum intervention.

V.7. Species To safeguard all notable species of flora and fauna.

V.8. Landscape To cause minimal adverse impact upon the landscape.

V.9.. Global impact To carry out agricultural, forestry and other land management activities with due regard for global environmental impacts and for sustainable development as defined in the Rio Declaration.

V.10. Lifestyle To carry out all domestic activities in a way which minimizes impact on the environment.

V.11. Public Access To facilitate public access and enjoyment of the site, whilst protecting that which is enjoyed.

V.12. Legal obligations To have proper regard for legal and other obligations and responsibilities.

V.13 Review procedure. The management plan for the site will be regularly reviewed.

 


The objectives are specifically outlined below:

V.2 Woodland

Operational Objective: Toconserve and enhance the woodland to retain its wildlife and landscape value by traditional and sustainable forms of management, whilst realizing a sustainable income from the timber. The area will be managed under a system of group selection, whereby trees will be planted and felled in groups, providing an element of continuous cover. The eventual aim will be mixed woodland with different age classes.

The woodland is to be gradually returned, through a felling regime based on group selection, to a 50 per cent broadleaved coppice with standards structure typical of English lowlands and 50 per cent unregimented conifer plantations. Glades and rides will be incorporated to improve the structural diversity of the wood. Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High   Timescal e: Continuous

The coniferous plantations will be managed in accordance with the principles and criteria of the Forestry Stewardship Council. Accreditation with the FSC will be sought when this is economically feasible. Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

Where possible, dead wood both standing and lying will be retained.  Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Nest boxes and bat-boxes will be provided throughout the wood constructed from home-grown timber. Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: Low   Timescale: Continuous

Brash left over from management will be piled up and left to rot.  Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

Ivy will be retained on trees unless this is so overwhelming that it may cause structural damage to the tree.  Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: Low  Timescale: Continuous

Small irregular shaped glades of approximately 30 metres will be cleared around selected ash trees within the conifer plantations to allow them to reach maturity and to encourage natural regeneration.  Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High  Timescale: Years 1,2 and 3

The clearing on top of the knoll should be felled gradually to avoid wi ndblow and a band of trees should be retained to the East.  Compartment : 2   Priority: High   Timescale: Years 1 and 2

Planted trees and where appropriate naturally regenerating seedlings must be protected from browsing animals; newly planted trees should be kept weed free and watered during extremely dry periods.  Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: Medium   Timescale: Continuous

The tree nursery established in compartment will be stocked with seedlings taken from Norton Covert and other local sources. Compartment: 5  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

All trees planted must be of local provenance if possible. Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The planting of stands of non-native species will be confined to the conifer plantations, except by agreement with the District Council.  Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The Douglas Fir will be thinned at a rate consistent with sustainable and even growth of the woodland and with sustained and regular operation of the sawmill. The edges of the wood will be thinned with caution so as to preserve a windbreak.  Compartment: 2,3   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The stands of hornbeam requir e only minimal management. Compartment: 2,3   Priority: Low  Timescale: Continuous

The larch will be gradually felled in small coupes sufficiently large to accommodate replanting as and when it is required for the sawmill. The hazel within each coupe will be coppiced simultaneously and a number of good specimen standard trees will be retained at the rate of 11 to the acre. Each coupe will be replanted with deciduous trees the same or the following winter. About 20 per cent of the larch -namely that sited along the southern and western borders and in the north west corner around the badgers setts -will be retained to provide shelter and a nesting place for buzzards and other birds. Compartment: 4   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The better specimens of larch, Douglas fir, ash, oak beech and sycamore will be retained as standards. Lower quality sycamore will be coppiced every eight to ten years to prevent it seeding; Lower quality ash will be coppiced so as to produce timber both for the sawmill and for coppice craft work. Hazel and alder will also be coppiced. Compartment: 6   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The laurel will continue to be felled and where appropriate, tree planting will take place. The arch of laurel at the junction of the two public footpaths will be retained as a feature for the time being. Thereafter small amounts of laurel will be maintained at a height of no more than five feet so as to afford cover and intimacy within the woodland.  Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High   Timescale: Years 1-4 and then continuous

The widening of the east/west ride will be completed. Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High   Timescale: Year 1

Heavy timber will be extracted by horse. Compartment: 2,3,4,6   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

V.3 Hedges

Operational Objective: To conserve and enhance the hedgerows and hedgerow trees to ensure they retain wildlife value and continue as important landscape features.

Existing hedges will be coppiced/laid/gapped up as appropriate. Compartment: 1,5,6  Priority: High   Timescale: Years 2 and 4

A meeting will be arranged with the Country Park to discuss in greater detail the problems relating to public access, tenure, lack of light and animal damage as regards the hedging of this boundary. Compartment: 2,3,4   Priority: High   Timescale: Year 1

A review will be made of the new stockfences erected by the Trust across these compartments, to predict their permanent value and to assess wh ether any might form the line of a new hedge. Compartment: 1,5  Priority: High   Timescale: Year 3

All hedgerow work will be confined to the winter months November till March. Compartment: All  Priority: Medium Timescale: Continuous

Stockplants for hedgerow replanting will be of UK origin and as far as possible from local stock. Compartment: All  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

V.4. Orchards

Operational Objective: To improve the orchards by gradually replacing the present stock with traditional standard varieties propitious for organic cultivation.

The dwarf eating apples will be intercropped and retained or removed as appropriate. Compartment: 1  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The Bramley orchards will be grazed by sheep or cows and if necessary scythed. In an experimental area every other tree will be removed to see if this improves productivity and ease of maintenance. Compartment: 1  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The south east corner “bottom square” will be replanted with traditional standard varieties of eating and cider apples and possibly other fruit. The trees will be protected from animals and planted at a density consistent with a grazing/haymaking re gime. Compartment: 1  Priority: High   Timescale: Years 2 to 4

The aged coxes in this compartment will be removed. Compartment: 5  Priority: High   Timescale: Years 1 and 2

The russets will be kept to assess their performance; and a decision whether or not to remove them will be made after year 3’s crop. Compartment: 5  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Year 2

Standard apple and possibly other fruit trees will be planted in selected parts of the compartment consistent with continued grazing by the horse and sheep/cows. Compartment: 5  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Years 4-5

The orchards will be managed organically and Soil Association accreditation for the apples will be retained.  Compartment: 1 and 5 Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

V.5. Grassland

Operational Objective: to conserve and enhance the quality of the meadowland through rotated grazing of organically maintained livestock and haymaking.

All livestock for meat or dairy will be managed and fed organically and Soil Association accreditation will be applied for. Compartment: 1 and 5 Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Grazing will be carried out in rotation, so far as possible to give each unit a rest o f at least three months between separate grazings by any particular animal. Sheep, goats or cows will follow the horse.  Compartment: 1and 5  Priority: High  Timescale: Continuous

All areas of grass to be chain harrowed at the end of winter. Compartment: 1 and 5 Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Invasive bracken will be removed by hand and used as thatching for garden sheds, compost heaps, plastic barrels etc. so as to diminish the visual impact of the horticultural paraphernalia. Compartment: 1 and 5 Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

Ragwort and invasive thistles will be pulled by hand before they go to seed and dead plants removed. Compartment: 1 and 5  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The bottom square will be grazed in winter and early Spring then left for hay. Hay will be made late, in July or August depending on the weather, to allow plants to flower. Flowering dock, thistles and ragwort will be removed by hand prior to haymaking. Compartment: 1  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The field at the north east corner (south facing slope) will not be grazed between May 1 and July 15 . A corner of  this field, presently outside the fence, will be left as rough grass and only occasionally grazed by a tethered goat or similar. Compartment: 1  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

At least four of the oak trees in the south facing slope and bottom square will be retained and fenced off from grazing animals if necessary. Compartment: 1  Priority: High   Timescale: Year 1

An area beneath the south facing slope has been reserved for an experimental forest garden. Compartment: 1  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

The acre to the west of the south facing slope, presently overgrown with brambles and regenerating oak, ash and cherry will remain a minimum intervention zone. Any management will protect or enhance tree growth. Compartment: 1  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

Greater efforts will be made to reverse the severe invasion of this pasture by stinging nettles, docks and creeping buttercup. Measures may include: removing the derelict apple trees; drag harrowing the nettles; topping docks and nettles more frequently with a horse drawn implement; fencing for goats; rooting up the worse areas with pigs and resowing; liming. Compartment: 5  Priority: High   Timescale: Years 1-3 and Continuous

Renewed efforts will be made to secure additional pasture nearby for the horse Compartment: 1 and 5 Priority: High & nbsp; Timescale: Years 1 to 2

V.6. Aquatic Habitats

Operational Objective: To conserve and enhance the spring, stream, marsh area and pond and to ensure they retain wildlife and recreational value through a policy of minimal intervention.

The stream will be kept clear of debris and any pollution avoided. Compartment: 6  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Work in marshy areas will be kept to a minimum and restricted to dry spells. Care will be taken not to cause erosion of the stream banks or excessive trampling during any tree felling or extraction. Compartment: 6  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Opening up the stream to the light will precede cautiously so as to preclude undesirable weed growth.. Compartment: 6  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Year 1 and 2

The bamboo stand to the west of the stream will be contained by regular cutting. Compartment: 6  Priority: Low  Timescale: Continuous

V.7. Species

Operational Objective: To safeguard all notable species of flora and fauna.

No work other than hazel coppicing and hedging to be carried out in the “badger zone” at the north west corner. All work to be carried out between 30 June and 1 December to avoid t he breeding period, and advice will be sought from MAFF and the Somerset Wildlife Trust Badger Group. Compartment: 4  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

One member of the trust to be given responsibility for identifying rare or sensitive species of flora and fauna on the site, and for ensuring that other members are aware of these species and make provision for their protection.  Compartment: 4 Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

V.8. Landscape

Operational Objective: To cause minimal adverse impact upon the landscape.

All permanent or semi-permanent plastic agricultural paraphernalia visible from the road or the other side of the valley to be covered with vegetation or dull-covered matting. Compartment: 1,5  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

All tarpaulin or canvas roofs to be replaced with timber, tile, thatch or earth within 3 years of erection. All corrugated iron roofs to be replaced by timber, tile, thatch or earth within five years of erection unless there are strong exceptional reasons for retaining corrugated iron. Compartment: 1,5  Priority: High   Timescale: Year 5

All plastic, cardboard or carpet mulch to be covered with vegetation, earth or sawdust. Compartment: All  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

All future polytunnels to be sited as unobtrusively as practicable. When a polytunnel plastic needs to be replaced, the person responsible will be required to supply an environmental audit and cost benefit analysis comparing continued polytunnel use with replacement by a new or secondhand glasshouse. Compartment: 1,5 Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

No domestic structures to be erected or domestic development to occur in these compartments other than the car park and the generation of electricity. Compartment: 1,3,4,5,6  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

All future agricultural structures to be clustered as far as practicable in one of the following zones: close to the barn, next to the greenhouse, next to the cider house, or next to the field shelter in compartment 5. Exceptions may include small discreet tool-sheds in gardens and a small field shelter serving the south facing slope and the bottom square. Compartment: 1  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

V.9. Sustainable development issues

Operational Objective: Agricultural, forestry and other land management activities to be carried out with due regard for global environmental impacts and for sustainable development as defined in th e Rio Declaration.

No fossil-fuel powered machinery or heating device to be used upon the land, except for delivery by motor vehicle to the car park, to the entrance of compartment 5, and exceptionally and by agreement with the Trust’s management, to an appropriately sited muck heap. The Trust reserves the right to make exceptions to this policy by full consensus at a management meeting. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

No more than three motor powered vehicles will be operated from the site. Compartment: 1  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

No sands or aggregates, other than Ham Hill stone-saw waste or recycled aggregates, to be employed without express permission of the Trust’s management. Compartment: All   Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

No industrially produced chemicals, such as creosotes, wood preservatives, pest poisons, chlorates etc. to be employed in contact with the land except those which are expressly permitted by the Soil Association, or which have been permitted for a specific purpose by the Trust’s management. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

No animal feeds or fertilizers imported from other countries to be used upon the land. Compartment: All   Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

No genetically modified produce to be used or consumed upon the land. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

V.10 Lifestyle

Operational Objective: To carry out all domestic activities in a way which minimizes impact on the environment.

Fire sites to be kept to a minimum and safely located away from combustible undergrowth or overhanging branches. Compartment: 2  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Firebeaters or Devon shovels will be kept close to water points at the top of the knoll, near the cider house and in compartment 5. Compartment: 1,2,5  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Ash from fires will be used as a crop fertilizer and can be stored dry before composting. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Latrines will be dug away from sensitive habitats and watercourses. Consideration will be given to improved forms of composting toilets. Compartment: 1,2  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Waste water will be dealt with in an environmentally sound way and not allowed to foul watercourses or cause eutrophication. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

All waste mater ials that cannot be re-used will be recycled if the facilities exist. No plastic will be burned on site and the Trust’s management may seek to ban the use of disposable plastics where a practicable alternative exists. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Dogs will not be allowed to range unattended at a risk to wildlife and livestock. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

All readily degradable vegetable waste (other than diseased plants and noxious perennial weeds) and all animal manure will be composted for use on crops. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

V.11. Public Access

Operational Objective: To facilitate public access and enjoyment of the site, whilst protecting that which is enjoyed.

The public rights of way will be maintained in a passable condition. Erosion on sloping paths will be stemmed by digging small gulleys to divert water run-off into the undergrowth. Compartment: 2,3,4,6  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The public are permitted to walk anywhere in the woods except :in the stream and marshy areas. Since most members of the public do not want to get their feet wet it has not been felt necessary to put up notices to this effect. C ompartment: 2,3,4,6  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

Horses and mountain bikes will be permitted in the woods as long as they do not cause erosion or other problems. If such problems do occur, solutions will be sought after consultation with the Country Park. Compartment: 2,3,4.6  Priority: Medium  Timescale: Continuous

The kissing gate on the public footpath at the south east end of compartment 4 was erected without our consent and obstructs the extraction of timber where we have extraction rights. A normal swing gate will be erected and the removal of the kissing gate will be requested. A swing gate will also be erected where the north/south public footpath meets the road at the south east corner of compartment 6. Compartment: 4,6  Priority: High   Timescale: Year 1

V.12. Legal Obligations

Operational Objectives: To have proper regard for legal and other obligations and responsibilities.

All felling will be carried out in accordance with the Forestry Authority code of working practice.  Compartment: 2,3,4.6  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

All reasonable steps will be taken to ensure the safety of  all who visit and work on the site. The Trust has an NFU insurance policy covering accident a nd injury to employees and the public. Compartment: All   Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

Measures, listed in the Fire Safety Plan provided by the County Fire Safety Officer, will be taken to minimize the risk of fire to dwellings or woodland. Compartment: 2,3,4,6  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

The Trust will endeavour to maintain good relations with neighbours and adjacent communities. Communications with the Trust may initially be addressed to the Secretary

V.13. Review Procedure

Operational Objective: The management plan for the site will be reviewed regularly.

All management procedures will be monitored for their effectiveness and modifications made to the plan as necessary. Such modifications can only be made by full consensus at a quorate management meeting of the Trust’s members.  Priority: High   Timescale: Continuous

An annual report on the progress made implementing the plan will be written and delivered to South Somerset District Council.   Priority: High   Timescale: Years 1 to 5

The management plan is then followed by a map of  Tinker’s Bubble with areas marked with numbers, but due to a lack of scanning facilities, we are unable to put the map on the webpage. For a complete photocopy of the management plan send £2.50 to Chapter 7, The Potato Store, Flax Drayton Farm, South Petherton, Somerset TA13.

a Landrights campaign for Britain

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